Katakana Game 2

By ĐỖ VĂN PHƯƠNG

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Genki Japan Disco Warm Up Stand Up Sit Down in Japanese

By ĐỖ VĂN PHƯƠNG

Genki Japan Disco Warm Up
Stand Up Sit Down in Japanese

 

Try doing the actions whilst watching the video!

tatte= tatte = stand up

suwatte= suwatte = sit down

rei= rei = bow

hakushu= hakushu = clap

te wo agete= te wo agete = hands up

alt= te wo oroshite = hands down


There s also the original Genki Disco Warm Up here and there is the Japanese poster in the Genki Japan Download Pack (see the offer below!)

alt

 

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Cool Phrases in Japanese

By ĐỖ VĂN PHƯƠNG

Cool Phrases in Japanese

NEW: Read the hints & tips I used to get fluent in Japanese.

Learning to speak Japanese is very easy! The problem is that most textbooks tell you the sort of formal boring stuff that quite frankly nobody really uses! So on this page I m going to teach you some cool little words and phrases that ll have almost  any Japanese person telling you how good you are! 


Click "next" on the animation below and move over the Japanese characters to hear them pronounced.

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Japanese Greetings

By ĐỖ VĂN PHƯƠNG

Japanese Greetings




As in many countries greetings are very important in Japan. In the morning your co-workers will greet you with a very genki "O ha yo go za i ma su". It s the "gozaimasu" which makes it polite just like the super polite "Thank you" is "A ri ga to u go za i ma su".

Then in the afternoon the greeting changes to the familar "Kon ni chi wa".

Then if you meet your friends in the evening it will be "Kon ban wa".

"O ya su mi na sa i" is "good night" but only just before you go to bed so it s mainly used in families. If you leave work late at night you ll have to say "shi tsu re i shi ma su" - "Sorry for being rude and going home before you all"!

As usual try out the game a few times and after you can get up to a score of 12 or 13 you ll have the pronunciation well and truly drummed into your head!

 

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Shopping in Japanese

By ĐỖ VĂN PHƯƠNG

Shopping in Japanese

Before you try this game you might want to try the How much? Japanese song!



There s an English version of this game on the Genki English CD Vol. 1. If you found it easy to learn Japanese this way your kids will love the CD version!

To use this game in a computer room get all the students to start at the same time and see who can fill the basket the quickest!

 

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Telling the Time in Japanese

By ĐỖ VĂN PHƯƠNG

Telling the Time in Japanese

Once you ve done the numbers telling the time in Japanese is very simple. You just add "ji" to the number to get the "o clock" part. 

Try out the game below and see how you go. As with the other games the best way to win is by making mistakes. After 20 minutes or so you ll have it mastered! If you re a teacher in Japan your students might like the CD version of this game.

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Months of the Year in Japanese: Game

By ĐỖ VĂN PHƯƠNG

Months of the Year in Japanese: Game

alt is the Japanese symbol that represents the moon and is read "tsu ki". But you can also read it as "getsu" or "gatsu" and if you put thenumbers 1 to 12 in front of it they become the months of the year.
This is just like English where "moon" and "month" are basically the same. 

Luckily unlike in English where the "8th month" October is actually the 10th month of the year in Japanese they haven t had any Roman Emperors messing around with things so it s really really simple "1 month" or "ichi gatsu" is January " ni gatsu" is February right up to " jyu ni gatsu " which is December. 

Have a look at the numbers page & Months of the Year song if you haven t yet done so then have a try at this quiz! Just click on the octopus!



 

 

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Country names in Japanese

By ĐỖ VĂN PHƯƠNG

Country names in Japanese

Note: Before trying this game have a run through the "Where are you from?" song. It will make things much easier!

Even if you speak fluent Japanese you ll still always be asked "Where are you from?" and be expected to answer with a foreign country. Here are a few to help you out.

If you don t know an answer just guess. After 20 minutes you ll have them all!

 

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Left & Right in Japanese

By ĐỖ VĂN PHƯƠNG

altLeft & altRight in Japanese



New: Try the new Learn Japanese Left & Right song!

There s an English version of this game on Genki English CD Vol. 1. If you found it easy to learn Japanese this way your kids will love the CD version!


To play this game in a computer room get all the students to start together and see who can get the highest score.


altLeft & altRight


Left in Japanese is "Hi da ri". Right is "Mi gi". Obviously they are very useful when you get lost and need directions. Simply say "XXX wa doko?" to ask where xxx is and you ll get a garble back that has lots of "Hi da ri"s and "Mi gi"s in it.

The symbols may look alike but with a cunning trick it s easy to remember which is which. 


Left  alt or "Hi da ri" is a symbol of a dude with a alt (which nearly looks like an "L") shaped tool in his Left hand.   Whereas alt or "Mi gi" is a dude with his Right hand putting something in his alt "Ku chi" or mouth.
     
Left Tool Right Mouth. Dead easy.



By the way you ll also see alt "Ku chi" everywhere in Japan as alt "De Gu chi" is exit and alt  "Iri guchi" is entrance. We just change the "ku chi" to "gu chi" to make it easier to say and it to make it sound more like "Gucci"as Japanese people love designer brands.



altUp & altDown

Up and down are also really easy. alt is "Ue" ( check out the game below to hear it!) and means "up" or "above" because the symbol is pointing up. 

alt is "Shi ta" which means "down" or "below" because it s pointing down. And I m sure you can think of a way to remember the pronunciation.

OK enough of the boring stuff as usual the best way to learn is by doing so switch on your speakers and get started with the game above. If you can get to 14 you are doing very well!

 

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Body Parts in Japanese. My ... Hurts!-日本のボディパーツ。私...痛い!

By ĐỖ VĂN PHƯƠNG

Body Parts in Japanese. My ... Hurts!

Here s a useful phrase and a few body parts if you ever get into any accidents in Japan! To say "My .... hurts" you simply say the body part followed by alt. Click the body parts below to hear the pronunciation. You ll probably also notice that in Japanese you say the same word for "leg" or "legs" and "foot" or "feet". But strangely enough they are written with different characters. So in this game you ll have your first kanji test telling the difference between alt ( foot or feet ) and alt ( leg or legs). Just remember that the leg one looks chunkier than the foot one! OK have a try with the game. To make it more fun get a friend on another computer and see who can finish the quickest. The English version of this game is on CD4.

 

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